China factory 18bar 13bar Dual Duty Diesel 4wheels Movable Twin Screw Air Compressor with 2stage Compression with Hot selling

Product Description

Product Description

Diesel mobile screw air compressor

This series of products pay more attention to the structural layout of products and the application of innovative technologies while improving the strength of the machine body. The self-developed cooler is equipped with fans with corresponding speed ratio, which can ignore all the high temperature weather. Diesel engines operating at economic speeds can improve fuel economy while operating at low noise. The double-door design greatly solves the trouble of inconvenient replacement of filter element during maintenance.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Type Screw Air Compressor
Item  18/18(24/13) Dual duty
Rated FAD 18/24 m³/min
Rate Pressure 18/13 bar
Diesel Brand CUMMINS Diesel
Engine Power 191KW
Compression stage 2 Stage
Whole Machine walking mode 4 wheels
Dimensions (L*W*H) 3200*2000*2600 mm
Weight 3700KG

 

Detailed Photos

 

Packaging & Shipping

 

Company Profile

FAQ

Q1: Are you factory or trade company?
A1: We are factory. And we have ourselves trading company.

Q2: What the exactly address of your factory?
A2: Our company is located in Kaixuan Road ,Economic Zone HangZhou, ZHangZhoug, China

Q3: Warranty terms of your machine?
A3: One year warranty for the machine and technical support according to your needs.

Q4: Will you provide some spare parts of the machines?
A4: Yes, of course.

Q5: What about the voltage of products? Can they be customized?
A5: Yes, of course. The voltage can be customized according to your equirement.

Q6: Which payment term can you accept?
A6: 30% T/T in advanced, 70% T/T against the B/L copy.

 

After-sales Service: 1 Year
Lubrication Style: Lubricated
Cooling System: Oil Cooling
Power Source: Diesel Engine
Cylinder Position: Angular
Structure Type: Closed Type
Customization:
Available

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air compressor

How Does Variable Speed Control Work in Screw Compressors?

Variable speed control in screw compressors is a technology that allows the compressor’s rotational speed to be adjusted according to the compressed air or gas demand. This control method offers several benefits in terms of energy efficiency and system performance. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Variable speed control, also known as variable frequency drive (VFD) or inverter control, works by adjusting the speed of the compressor’s drive motor. The drive motor is typically an electric motor that powers the rotation of the compressor’s screw rotors.

The key components and operation of variable speed control in screw compressors are as follows:

  • 1. Drive Motor: The drive motor is connected to the compressor’s screw rotors and provides the rotational power required for compression. It is an electric motor capable of operating at variable speeds.
  • 2. Inverter or Variable Frequency Drive (VFD): The inverter or VFD is an electronic device that controls the speed of the drive motor. It converts the incoming electrical power into adjustable frequency and voltage, allowing precise control of the motor’s rotational speed.
  • 3. Control System: The control system of the screw compressor monitors and adjusts the speed of the drive motor based on the compressed air or gas demand. It receives input signals from sensors that measure parameters such as pressure, flow rate, or system demand, and sends corresponding signals to the inverter or VFD to regulate the motor speed.
  • 4. Speed Adjustment: When the demand for compressed air or gas decreases, the control system reduces the motor speed by decreasing the frequency and voltage supplied by the inverter or VFD. This results in a lower rotational speed of the screw rotors, reducing the compression capacity and power consumption of the compressor.
  • 5. Energy Efficiency: Variable speed control allows the compressor to match the output to the actual demand, avoiding energy wastage associated with constant-speed compressors. By operating at lower speeds during periods of lower demand, energy consumption can be significantly reduced. This energy-saving capability is particularly advantageous in applications with varying air or gas requirements.
  • 6. Smooth Operation: Variable speed control enables smooth and gradual motor acceleration and deceleration, minimizing mechanical stress on the compressor components and reducing the likelihood of sudden pressure surges or system shutdowns.
  • 7. System Stability: By adjusting the compressor’s speed to match the demand, variable speed control helps maintain stable system pressure and prevents excessive cycling of the compressor. This contributes to improved system performance and longevity.

It’s worth noting that variable speed control is more commonly found in larger screw compressors used in industrial and commercial applications. Smaller screw compressors may utilize fixed-speed motors due to cost considerations or simpler system requirements.

Overall, variable speed control in screw compressors offers precise capacity modulation, improved energy efficiency, enhanced system stability, and reduced maintenance requirements, making it a preferred choice in many applications where compressed air or gas demand fluctuates.

air compressor

How Do You Troubleshoot Common Issues with Screw Compressors?

Troubleshooting common issues with screw compressors involves a systematic approach to identify and resolve problems that may arise during operation. Here’s a detailed explanation:

1. Gather Information:

  • Start by gathering information about the symptoms and any recent changes or events related to the compressor. This can help pinpoint potential causes and guide the troubleshooting process.

2. Check Power and Controls:

  • Ensure that the compressor has a power supply and that all electrical connections are secure. Check for any tripped breakers or blown fuses. Verify that the compressor’s controls, such as pressure switches, temperature sensors, and safety devices, are functioning correctly.

3. Inspect for Leaks:

  • Check for any visible leaks in the compressed air system, including connections, fittings, hoses, and seals. Leaks can cause a drop in system pressure and affect the compressor’s performance. Repair or replace any damaged components.

4. Monitor Pressure and Temperature:

  • Monitor the discharge pressure and temperature of the compressor. Abnormal readings can indicate issues such as inadequate lubrication, high discharge temperatures, or problems with the cooling system. Refer to the manufacturer’s specifications for acceptable pressure and temperature ranges.

5. Verify Lubrication:

  • Ensure that the compressor’s lubrication system is functioning correctly. Check oil levels and the condition of the lubricant. Inadequate lubrication can lead to increased friction, overheating, and damage to internal components. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for lubricant type and change intervals.

6. Check Air Filters and Cooling System:

  • Inspect and clean or replace the air filters to ensure proper airflow. Clogged filters can reduce efficiency and increase the compressor’s operating temperature. Additionally, check the cooling system, including fans and heat exchangers, to ensure they are clean and functioning correctly.

7. Examine Vibration and Noise:

  • Pay attention to any unusual vibration or noise coming from the compressor. Excessive vibration may indicate misalignment, worn bearings, or loose components. Unusual noise can be a sign of mechanical issues or problems with the intake or discharge system.

8. Review Maintenance Records:

  • Review the compressor’s maintenance records to ensure that regular maintenance tasks, such as oil changes, filter replacements, and inspections, have been performed according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Address any overdue or missed maintenance tasks.

9. Consult Manufacturer Documentation:

  • Refer to the compressor’s operating manual and troubleshooting guide provided by the manufacturer. These documents often contain specific troubleshooting steps for common issues and can provide valuable insights.

10. Seek Professional Assistance:

  • If the troubleshooting steps do not resolve the issue or if you are unsure about performing further diagnostics, it is recommended to seek assistance from a qualified technician or contact the compressor manufacturer’s technical support.

Remember to prioritize safety throughout the troubleshooting process, following appropriate lockout/tagout procedures and wearing the necessary personal protective equipment.

In summary, troubleshooting common issues with screw compressors involves checking power and controls, inspecting for leaks, monitoring pressure and temperature, verifying lubrication, checking air filters and cooling systems, examining vibration and noise, reviewing maintenance records, consulting manufacturer documentation, and seeking professional assistance when needed. By following a systematic approach, it is possible to identify and resolve common problems with screw compressors, ensuring their proper operation and performance.

air compressor

How Does a Screw Compressor Work?

A screw compressor operates based on a unique rotary positive displacement principle. Here’s a detailed explanation:

Working Principle:

A screw compressor consists of two helical rotors, typically referred to as male and female rotors, that rotate in opposite directions within a housing. The rotors have specially designed profiles that interlock with each other, creating a series of compression chambers as they rotate. The compression chambers gradually reduce in volume as the rotors rotate, compressing the air or gas trapped inside.

Suction Process:

The suction process begins when the rotors start rotating. As they rotate, the helical lobes or threads on the rotors create expanding spaces between them. The expanding spaces draw in the air or gas from the inlet port, allowing it to enter the compression chamber. The suction process continues as the rotors rotate, and the expanding spaces move the air or gas towards the discharge side of the compressor.

Compression Process:

As the air or gas enters the compression chamber, it gets trapped between the interlocking lobes or threads of the rotors. As the rotors continue to rotate, the trapped air or gas is carried along the length of the rotors. The volume of the compression chamber gradually decreases as the lobes or threads of the rotors intermesh, compressing the air or gas. The compression process is continuous and smooth as the air or gas moves from the suction side to the discharge side of the compressor.

Discharge Process:

Once the air or gas reaches the discharge end of the compression chamber, it is pushed towards the outlet port. The compressed air or gas is then released from the compressor through the outlet port to be used for various applications.

Oil-Injected and Oil-Free Variants:

Screw compressors are available in both oil-injected and oil-free variants. In oil-injected screw compressors, a small amount of lubricating oil is injected into the compression chamber. The oil provides lubrication, cooling, and sealing between the rotors, reducing friction and minimizing wear. The oil-injected variant is commonly used in industrial applications where a small amount of oil in the compressed air is acceptable.

Oil-free screw compressors, on the other hand, are designed to operate without the need for oil lubrication. These compressors use specialized rotor coatings, such as PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) or other non-stick materials, to reduce friction and eliminate the need for oil. Oil-free screw compressors are preferred in applications that require oil-free and contaminant-free compressed air, such as in the food and beverage, pharmaceutical, and electronics industries.

In summary, a screw compressor works by utilizing interlocking helical rotors to compress air or gas. The rotating rotors draw in the air or gas during the suction process, and as they rotate, the trapped air or gas is compressed within the compression chamber. The compressed air or gas is then discharged from the compressor. Screw compressors are available in oil-injected and oil-free variants, catering to different application requirements.

China factory 18bar 13bar Dual Duty Diesel 4wheels Movable Twin Screw Air Compressor with 2stage Compression   with Hot sellingChina factory 18bar 13bar Dual Duty Diesel 4wheels Movable Twin Screw Air Compressor with 2stage Compression   with Hot selling
editor by CX 2023-10-09

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